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A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment- Coursera Quiz Answer | 100% Correct Answers

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A Life of Happiness and Fulfillment

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Week- 1

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Week-3

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Week-4 (Quiz-1)

Self-grading for assignment #4 (The 4th happiness exercise: leading a healthy lifestyle)

 

1. Since there isn’t a direct way by which you can give yourself a score between 1 and 10 for the self-graded assignment #2 (expressing gratitude exercise), we have designed this rather roundabout way of doing so.

Below, you will find a list of 10 “questions” and two options for each question. Please check the 1st of these two options if you want to give yourself 1 point. You will get as many points as the number of 1st options you check.

So, if you believe that you deserve to get a score of 7 (out of 10) for this assignment, check the 1st option for 7 of the 10 questions below, and select the 2nd option for 3 of them.

Note that, whenever you check the 2nd option, you will receive feedback that your response was “incorrect.” Ignore this feedback. Like we said earlier, since there aren’t any options on Coursera (yet!) for self-grading, we had to invent this rather roundabout way of doing it!

Here’s how you would arrive at the score you deserve for this exercise:

The exercise can be thought to consist of 3 main components:

i. Making a “healthy lifestyle” plan on the link to the exercise

ii. Doing one’s best to stick to one’s plan

iii. Answering questions (what was your plan? how well were you able to stick to it?, and what did you learn from this experience?) about the exercise.

If you completed the 1st component, give yourself 5 points.

If you completed the 2nd component, give yourself another 3 points.

If you completed the 3rd component (even if you only did it on the discussion forum), give yourself another 2 points.

Final and very important note: You will need to check at least one of the 10 options for you to “pass” this assignment and continue with the course. So, even if you haven’t started this exercise (and don’t intend to complete it), give yourself a score of at least 1 point (or 10%) by checking one of the 10 boxes.

Thanks, and if you happen to have any questions, please post them on the “assignments” link under the discussion forum.

 

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

2.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

3.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

4.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

5.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

6.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

7.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

8.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

9.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

10.

  • I would give myself 1 point out of 10
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

 

 

Quiz 2

 

1. The experiments conducted by Harry Harlow showed that:

 

  • Orphans are likely to develop psychological problems if they are not provided “contact comfort”
  • Baby monkeys reared on the wire mesh mother figure turned out to be far less “secure” than were those raised on the cloth mother figure
  • For baby monkeys, the need for love and nurturance is potentially even more important than is the need for food and nutrients
  • Baby monkeys need as much love and nurturance as human babies do

2. Imagine that you are watching a sporting event in the presence of others. Extrapolating from the findings of Raghunathan and Corfman, in which of the following situations would your enjoyment be the greatest:

 

  • When your team won, and you were surrounded by others who did not support your team
  • When your team lost and you were surrounded by others who supported your team
  • When watching the game live as opposed to those watching it taped

3. The “scarcity principle” explains which of the following phenomena:

 

  • Why being needy lowers happiness
  • Why being secure leads to fulfilling relationships
  • Why exposure to words like “love” or “hugs” can temporarily boost relationship security
  • Why being avoidant lowers happiness

4. Which of the following needs explains why the idea of “going it alone” sounds very appealing:

 

  • The need for mastery
  • The need for autonomy
  • The need for superiority
  • The need for belongingness

5. Which of the following practices has the potential to lower neediness and avoidance and instill “secure attachment” in relationships?

 

  • Self-compassion
  • Expressing gratitude
  • Seeking the need to love (and give)
  • All of the above

6. What did the study conducted by Prof. Mike Norton and his colleagues (in which students who were given either $5 or $20 to spend on themselves vs. others) reveal?

  • Those from rich countries tend to derive a smaller boost in happiness levels from being given free money than those from poorer countries
  • Students who bought a toy for others were happier than those who bought them coffee
  • Those who spent money on others were happier than those who spent it on themselves
  • Those who were given $20 were happier than those who were given $5

7. Which of the following statements about the relationship between generosity and happiness at the country-level is true?

  • In 120 of the 136 countries, those who donated to charity were happier than those who didn’t
  • The effect of charity on happiness was similar to that of doubling household income
  • It’s not clear if charity enhances happiness or the other way around
  • All of the above

8. In the study involving “Gold fish,” which group of toddlers was the happiest?

 

  • Those who were asked to share one of their own treats with the monkey
  • Those who were asked to share the experimenter’s treats with the monkey
  • Those who got to not just give a treat to the monkey, but also to pet it
  • Those who watched the experimenter give a treat to the monkey

9. Which of the following was NOT mentioned as a reason why being loving and giving enhances happiness levels?

 

  • Being loving and giving makes us feel more capable and competent, which makes us feel good
  • Being loving and giving makes us feel independent from others and this sense of independence enhances happiness
  • It’s our nature to be loving and giving; hence, being loving and giving enhances happiness
  • Being loving and giving sets up a positive reciprocity; others are loving and giving to us in return, which makes us happy

10. Based on Reb Rebele’s description of Prof. Adam Grant (and others’ work) on reciprocity styles, which of the following groups of people are disproportionately represented at the top of organizations

  • Matchers
  • Takers
  • “Otherish” givers
  • “Selfless” givers

11. Which of the following conclusions is best supported by the “cocaine study” (done with rats) and the study done with residents of the old age home?

  • After a certain age, it really doesn’t matter how much control you have over your decisions
  • Even if you abused alcohol, you’d live longer if you were in control of when and how much to drink than if you weren’t in control of these decisions
  • Cocaine is superior to coca cola when it comes having a good time
  • If you want to feel uninhibited at a party, it’s best to drink copious quantities of alcohol

12. “Psychological reactance” is closest to which of the following phenomena:

 

  • We value things more when they are difficult to get
  • We like and respect charismatic and persuasive leaders
  • We love it when we are in control and hate it when we are not
  • We resist others’ attempts to control us

13. Which of these was NOT discussed as a reason why being overly controlling of others or of external circumstances lowers happiness levels?

  • Being overly controlling makes one superstitious and this could potentially lower the quality of decisions we make
  • Being overly controlling makes us dependent on others, leading eventually to neediness
  • Being overly controlling can lead to higher risk taking, which jeopardizes the quality of decisions one makes
  • Those who are overly controlling are likely to get frustrated when things don’t go according to plan

14. External control enjoys which type of relationship with the internal control?

 

  • Compensatory
  • Additive
  • Multiplicative
  • Geometric

15. The idea that our expected enjoyment of vacations is often greater than our actual enjoyment of the vacation suggests that:

  • We are doomed to never really enjoy vacations—so we should never go on them
  • Our imaginations have a powerful impact on our feelings
  • We shouldn’t seek to control our vacations; we should just “go with the flow”
  • We are capable of empathizing with others, even if their life circumstances are totally different

16. With regard to taking personal responsibility for one’s own happiness, which of the following is the wrong question to ask (according to what was discussed in the video lectures)?

  • Can I be happy if something extreme—like loss of a job or breaking a bone—happens?
  • Why does trusting others affect my happiness?
  • What if feeling sad is a natural part of life?
  • What if I can’t surrender myself to outcomes I can’t control?

17. Which of these is a common misconception about “taking personal responsibility for your happiness”?

 

  • The best way to gain the ability to take personal responsibility for happiness is to practice with mundane negative events rather than with extreme ones
  • Taking personal responsibility means being happy all the time
  • Taking personal responsibility for one’s happiness will lead others to take advantage of one
  • It’s going to take a lot of time and effort to gain “personal mastery”

18. Which of the following is NOT a good tactic if you want to regulate your emotions:

  • Labeling your emotions
  • Suppressing your emotions
  • Attention deployment
  • Reinterpreting the event

19. In the study in which participants’ predicted versus actual happiness levels upon receiving a dollar was measured, results revealed that:

 

  • Participants predicted that their happiness levels would be higher if they did not get to know the reason for the free dollar, and this prediction was inaccurate
  • Participants predicted that their happiness levels would be higher if they came to know the reason for the free dollar, and this prediction was accurate
  • Participants predicted that their happiness levels would be higher if they did not come to know the reason for the free dollar, whereas, in reality, their happiness levels were higher when they did get to know the reason for receiving the free dollar
  • Participants predicted that their happiness levels would be higher if they came to know the reason for the free dollar, whereas, in reality, their happiness levels were higher when they did not get to know the reason for receiving the free dollar20. Which of the following was NOT discussed as a finding in the lectures on “eating right, moving more, sleeping better?”

 

  • Inactivity kills more people worldwide than does smoking
  • Almost everyone requires between 7 and 9 hours of sleep (per day-night cycle) in order to feel well-rested
  • When your diet doesn’t have enough meat and protein, you look less attractive
  • For every hour that you spend idly in front of a TV after the age of 25 decrease life-expectancy by 22 minutes

 

 

Week-5

Peer-graded Assignment: The 6th Happiness Exercise: 3 good things (with a twist!)

 

Project Title *
Give your project a descriptive title

3 good things (with a twist!)

1. Overall, how easy or difficult was this exercise for you? Why?

The exercise was somewhat simple and it required some investment to think however by and large it was acceptable.

2. How much more (or less) confident do you now feel that no event or outcome is “purely” positive or negative? Why (or why not)?

As a matter of fact, presently I feel that no occasion is totally good or entirely negative, it is dependent upon us to change over the delight and organization existing apart from everything else.

3. Typically, those who do this exercise can more spontaneously see the positive consequences triggered by negative events. Did this happen to you? (Please elaborate.)

Yeah…I really become acquainted with that there is no totally negative occasion , on the off chance that we need we can change over it to positive

 

 

Week-6

Self-grading: Watching course video lectures

 

1. Since there isn’t a direct way by which you can give yourself a score between 1 and 10 for the self-graded assignment #2 (expressing gratitude exercise), we have designed this rather roundabout way of doing so.

Below, you will find a list of 10 “questions” and two options for each question. Please check the 1st of these two options if you want to give yourself 1 point. You will get as many points as the number of 1st options you check.

So, if you believe that you deserve to get a score of 7 (out of 10) for watching the course videos, check the 1st option for 7 of the 10 questions below, and select the 2nd option for 3 of them.

Note that, whenever you check the 2nd option, you will receive feedback that your response was “incorrect.” Ignore this feedback. Like we said earlier, since there aren’t any options on Coursera (yet!) for self-grading, we had to invent this rather roundabout way of doing it!

Here’s how you would arrive at the score you deserve for this exercise:

There are 9 modules in the course and you get 1 point for completing each module. Plus, you get 1 extra point for just completing this quiz (that’s how nice we are!)

So, for example, if you completed just module 1 (Course intro and happiness measurement) and nothing else, you would check the 1st option for this question and for question 2, which will give you 2 points. If you completed both module 1 and module 2 and nothing else, you would check the 1st option for this and the next 2 questions, which will give you 3 points and so on.

Final and very important note: You will need to check at least one of the 10 options for you to “pass” this assignment and continue with the course. So, even if you haven’t watched any of the videos, give yourself a score of at least 1 point (or 10%) by checking the 1st option for one of the 10 questions.

Thanks, and if you happen to have any questions, please post them on the “assignments” link under the discussion forum.

 

  • I give myself 1 point out of 1 for participating in this quiz
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

2.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 1
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

3.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 2
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

4.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 3
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

5.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 4
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

6.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 5
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

7.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 6
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

8.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 7
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

9.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 8
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

10.

  • I would give myself 1 point for completing Module 9
  • I wouldn’t give myself any points for this question

 

 

Final exam (Part 1)

1. In the “wallet drop study” (conducted by the Toronto Star) what was the main measure of interest?

 

  • Whether the wallet was returned
  • Amount of money that was taken
  • The missing credit cards
  • How expensive stolen wallets are

2. In the “trust game” study conducted by the Swiss researchers, which of the following proportion of participants is closest to the number who returned the money if they were trusted with the $10?

 

  • 44%
  • 10%
  • 66%
  • 95%

3. One of the main reasons why it is difficult to proactively trust others is because:

 

  • There are lots of hidden costs of being proactively trusting
  • There is little to be gained from proactively trusting others
  • People are less trustworthy than we perceive them to be
  • We are hardwired to distrust others, particularly strangers

4. Which of the following is NOT a hidden benefit of being proactively trusting of others?

 

  • Building a community of trustworthy relationships
  • Feeling good when one’s trust is reciprocated
  • Contributing to society’s upliftment
  • All of the above are hidden benefits of being proactively trusting

5. Which of the following was NOT discussed as a strategy for mitigating the psychological pain of being cheated?

  • Forgiveness
  • Holding those who cheat accountable for their action
  • Reminding oneself that trust begets trustworthiness
  • Recognizing that if those who are materially well off aren’t willing to do their bit to enhance trust levels in society, then we can’t really expect those who are worse off to play that role

6. William Blake’s quote “Joy and woe are woven fine” best captures which of the following “facts” about life:

 

  • It’s difficult to control life’s outcomes
  • Those of a spiritual bent are happier than those who aren’t
  • It’s difficult to categorize outcomes as unambiguously “good” or “bad”
  • Happy people, in general, tend to do better in life than their less-happy counterparts

7. The “need to be busy” studies, along with studies on flow indicate that:

 

  • We don’t need to rely on outcomes for our happiness
  • Both outcomes and processes are important determinants of happiness
  • Outcomes are a much more significant determinant of happiness than are processes
  • It’s best not to rely on either outcomes or processes for happiness

8. The dispassionate pursuit of passion is difficult because:

 

  • Being dispassionate about something means having no curiosity or interest in life
  • It’s difficult to have no desires
  • It’s difficult to change one’s mind about outcomes before they occur versus after (due to the need for consistency)
  • d. All of the above

9. Which of the following was NOT discussed as a strategy for instilling the dispassionate pursuit of passion?

  • Self-compassion
  • “Three good things with a twist”
  • Reminiscing about past negative events and recognizing that, if we could change our minds about them, there’s a good chance we’ll change our minds about current negative events
  • Gratitude

10. Based on the placebo effects findings, one could conclude that the following belief is the most scientifically valid:

 

  • Life is benign
  • Life is malign
  • Life is indifferent
  • None of the above beliefs about life is any more scientifically valid than the other

11. Which of the following was NOT a finding that emerged from Matt Killingworth’s (and his colleague’s) studies on mindfulness?

 

  • Incredibly, even if experiencing something negative, people are happier (or less unhappy) when their minds don’t wander than when they do
  • The best way to not let the mind wander is to distance oneself from one’s “GATEs” (Goals, Actions/Action tendencies, Thoughts, and Emotions)
  • People’s minds wander a LOT—roughly 50% of the time
  • People’s minds wander least when they are having sex

12. Which of these is NOT likely to be a consequence of practising mindfulness?

 

  • The pace at which one’s mind lurches from one element of the GATE to the other slows down
  • One becomes more “present oriented”
  • Attentional blink increases
  • All of the above

13. The practice of mindfulness results in cortical:

 

  • Broadening
  • Weakening
  • Emancipation
  • Thickening

14. According to Prof. Shauna Shapiro, one of the most “hopeful” and “optimistic” themes that emerge from the studies on mindfulness is that the practice can:

 

  • Help overcome the happiness “set point”
  • Reverse aging
  • Help get rid of the “cobwebs” in one’s brain
  • Help overcome relationship stress

15. According to the discussions in the video lectures, which of these was explicitly mentioned as a misconception about mindfulness that prevents people from taking up the practice?

 

  • That it will lead to not experiencing moments of pure joy and exhilaration
  • That it will make one overly scientific and analytical
  • That it will kill creativity
  • That it will lead one to become soft and weak

16. According to Prof. Richie Davidson, the goal in mindfulness is to:

 

  • Change one’s relationship with thoughts
  • Completely stop thinking
  • Think only kind and compassionate thoughts
  • Treat thoughts as a type of feeling

17. According to Prof. Richie Davidson, one of the best ways to overcome the frustration from practising mindfulness is to:

 

  • Start chanting a favorite “mantra” whenever you feel bored
  • Start with very short—1 to 2 minute—daily practice
  • Focus only on the positive consequences of mindfulness and ignore the negative ones
  • Concentrate on the “third eye”—the region between the eyebrows

18. Chade Meng Tan uses the metaphor of riding a __________ to help understand how to practise mindfulness:

 

  • Bicycle
  • Airplane
  • Cobra
  • Wave

19. According to Steven Pressfield, one way to overcome the internal “resistance” is by:

 

  • Finding a coach
  • “Turning pro”
  • Practising in groups
  • Practising mindfulness, of course!

20. According to the “two approaches to MBA” framework, which of the following is the “5th determinant of happiness”?

 

  • Basic necessities
  • MBA (Mastery, Belongingness, and Autonomy)
  • MBA (Masters in Business Administration)
  • The “abundance” (vs. “scarcity”) route to MBA (Mastery, Belongingness, and Autonomy)

 

 

Peer-graded Assignment: Final Exam (Part 2)

Project Title *
Give your project a descriptive title

Conceptual memory and understanding for various important concepts

1. a.

A big reason why many of us commit the fundamental happiness paradox is because we harbor negative misconceptions about happiness. Mention at least two such negative misconceptions and provide some support for why they aren’t valid. That is, refer to at least one research finding (you don’t need to cite the paper) that indicates that the negative misconception is invalid.(3 point)

The three negative confusions we examined are:i. Satisfaction prompts laziness ii. Satisfaction prompts self-centeredness, andiii. Satisfaction is temporary Findings show that more joyful individuals are, indeed, more beneficial and fruitful than the individuals who are less upbeat. In particular, this is what discoveries show:• Happier protection operators sell more insurance• Happy representatives win more• Happier (hopeful) CEOs cultivate a more sure work-atmosphere, which thus improves hierarchical productivity• Happier CEOs get better appraisals from directors of their sheets and head organizations with more prominent profits for investment,• Happier batsmen in Cricket have higher batting averagesSo, the possibility that bliss prompts sluggishness isn’t legitimate. Discoveries additionally show that satisfaction doesn’t prompt narrow-mindedness; actually, it prompts unselfishness. In particular, this is what discoveries show:• Happy individuals volunteer more for social causes• Happy individuals are bound to pass judgment on others favorably,• and are additionally ready to impart their favorable luck to others more equitably• People feeling cheerful offer more cash to good cause; they are likewise bound to give bloodand my top choice, since I am continually searching for members to run my examinations Happy individuals are bound to chip in for an additional analysis Finally, albeit numerous individuals accept that satisfaction can’t keep going long—that is, it is momentary—notably, a great deal relies upon how one characterizes bliss. On the off chance that one characterizes it more along the lines of adoration/association or plenitude, joy can possibly last any longer than if one likens it to tactile delight or hubristic pride.

1 b.

Viktor Frankl, the gentleman who wrote, Man’s search for meaning, is reputed to have said, “Don’t aim at success. The more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you are going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue…”

Frankl’s quote suggests that it’s better not to pursue happiness. Please indicate whether you agree or disagree with Frankl’s statement and justify your position by referring to relevant findings. (2 points.)

I agree with Frankl on the grounds that discoveries demonstrate that, while it is critical to organize satisfaction, it’s similarly significant not to seek after (or pursue it) since, discoveries show that when one seeks after bliss, one is probably going to be less cheerful therefore. In particular, seeking after satisfaction drives one to contrast one’s present bliss levels and one’s optimal joy levels, and such an examination has been appeared to bring down joy levels.

 

2. a.

In Week 2 of the course, 3 characteristics of flow were discussed. Mention two of the three and, using an example (e.g., game of Tennis), describe one of these two features. (3 points.)

The three characteristics of stream that were talked about are:i. Incomprehensible view of timeii. Loss of reluctance, andiii. Zero in on the current second (sub-objective—or sub-sub-objective) A case of dumbfounding impression of time is that, during stream, time can appear to back off so you feel as is everything is going in moderate movement. E.g., in the event that you experience stream as you are playing tennis, you may feel that the ball is coming towards you in moderate movement, and that you can see the hide ready. Notwithstanding, when the game is finished, you may feel that time passed by truly quick. Along these lines, for instance, you may even miss lunch or a resulting arrangement when you are trapped in stream. Another element of stream is simply the need awareness. During stream, you don’t have that “inward voice” or “judge” remarking on how well or ineffectively you are doing what you are doing. In this way, you won’t assess yourself as you are occupied with the movement. The explanation behind this has to do with the way that stream minutes happen when you are “extended”; thus, you don’t have any overabundance limit left over to pass judgment or assess how you are getting along: being in stream takes all that you got. A last element of stream is that you are seriously centered around the current second. State, for instance, that you are ascending a stone face and your possible objective is to have an excursion lunch with a companion. On the off chance that you are in stream, you wouldn’t consider this possible objective; your consideration would be centered around the following sub-objective or sub-sub-objective—e.g., regardless of whether you have to powder your hands or which bush to clutch as you lift yourself up the stone face.

 

2. b.

A remarkable feature of flow is that almost everyone has experienced it. Another remarkable feature is that it can be experienced so long as a simple condition is met. What is that condition? Be specific. (2 points.)

Flow is experienced when expected capacity (to carry out a responsibility) is coordinated by accessible capacity. All the more explicitly, stream is doubtlessly when required capacity is simply above accessible capacity; accordingly, one is made to extend a tad past what one definitely knows—that is when stream is the best bet

 

3. a.

The Dalai Lama is supposed to have said, “If you want to make others happy, be compassionate. If you want to be happy yourself, be compassionate.”

Would you agree with this statement? In answering this question, please refer to at least two of the many findings we discussed on the impact that being kind and compassionate has on happiness. (2 points.)

I agree with the Dalai Lama’s announcement since various discoveries have indicated that being cherishing and giving—that is, being benevolent and sympathetic—fulfills us. Here are the discoveries that we examined:- One examination, directed by Prof. Norton and his co-creator demonstrated that understudies given $5 or $20 were more joyful when they spent it on others than on themselves;- Another investigation, utilizing Gallup survey information, indicated that in a greater part of nations (120 of 136 nations), the individuals who gave to noble cause in the earlier month were fundamentally more joyful than the individuals who didn’t; Yet another examination indicated that even babies are more joyful when they are benevolent and liberal than when they are not; in this examination, little children were given some Goldfish saltines and requested to expend it themselves or to take care of it to a (manikin) monkey; little children who parted with their goldfish (to the monkey) were more joyful than the individuals who devoured it themselves.- Other investigations have demonstrated that being thoughtful and liberal effects achievement. Providers (otherish suppliers, to be explicit), for instance, are significantly more liable to ascend to the head of their associations than are takers or matchers. In like manner, discoveries by business analyst Arthur Brooks indicated that the individuals who give $1 to good cause wind up gaining $3.75 consequently.

 

3. b.

Consider this statement: Givers are always more successful than takers or matchers. Do you agree with the statement? Justify your answer by referring to relevant findings. (2 points)

Givers aren’t really in every case more fruitful than takers or matchers. A great deal relies upon what sort of supplier you are. Discoveries show that it is otherish suppliers, instead of sacrificial providers who ascend to the head of their organizations.The purpose behind this is on the grounds that otherish suppliers are more averse to burnout—since they deal with themselves as well (and not only others) by remembering themselves for the “hover of liberality.”

 

4. a.

We discussed several reasons why seeking to control others and outcomes lowers happiness levels. Mention at least three reasons and elaborate on them. (3 points)

Indeed, I do agree with this announcement. The announcement implies that, the more inside control one has, the less outside control one will look for. There are a few investigations that are reliable with this thought. For instance, the paper investigations of Prof. Raghunathan show that our craving for outside control goes up when we need authority over our sentiments—e.g., when we understand pushed or on edge. In one investigation (led by Prof. Raghunathan), members were approached to list the things that they might want to do when they feel on edge and pushed. Discoveries indicated that individuals’ propensity to look for outside control—e.g., get the space around them composed, attempt to get to the lower part of the difficult that is causing them to feel on edge, and so on.— was higher when they felt pushed. The opposite has been demonstrated as well: it is the point at which we feel that we don’t have an adequately significant level of authority over our outside climate that we look for methods of taking inside control. This is one motivation behind why being profound or strict makes a difference. Discoveries from one investigation by Pollner indicated that that one motivation behind why strict individuals are more joyful that non-strict individuals is on the grounds that their faith in God gives them a feeling of vicarious authority over outer conditions. Additionally, individuals will in general turn out to be more offbeat when they are put under pressure. This happens is on the grounds that the notion demonstrations like a prop; it gives individuals a feeling of interior consolation when they need authority over the outside circumstance

 

4. b.

“Internal and external control are compensatory forces.” What does this statement mean and do you agree with it? Justify your answer by referring to relevant studies/findings that show that internal and external control are compensatory in nature (or not). (2 points.)

Truly, I do concur with this announcement. The announcement implies that, the more interior control one has, the less outer control one will look for. There are a few examinations that are predictable with this thought. For instance, the exposition investigations of Prof. Raghunathan show that our craving for outside control goes up when we need power over our emotions. The converse has been demonstrated as well: it is the point at which we feel that we don’t have an adequately elevated level of command over our outside climate that we look for methods of taking inner control. This is one motivation behind why being otherworldly or strict makes a difference. Discoveries from one investigation by Pollner indicated that that one motivation behind why strict individuals are more joyful that non-strict individuals is on the grounds that their faith in God gives them a feeling of vicarious authority over outside conditions. Thus, individuals will in general turn out to be more offbeat when they are put under pressure. This happens is on the grounds that the notion demonstrations like a support; it gives individuals a feeling of inside consolation when they need power over the outside circumstance.

 

5. a.

What do findings by John Helliwell and his co-authors reveal about the relationship between trust and happiness of countries? The “wallet drop” study conducted by The Toronto Star reveals an interesting fact about trust. Mention this interesting fact and then, based on this fact, draw an implication for “exercising smart trust.” (2 points.)

Findings indicated that individuals’ inclination to look for outer control—e.g., get the space around them sorted out, attempt to get to the lower part of the difficult that is causing them to feel on edge, and so forth.— was higher when they felt pushed. The converse has been demonstrated as well: it is the point at which we feel that we don’t have an adequately significant level of authority over our outer climate that we look for methods of taking inner control. This is one motivation behind why being otherworldly or strict makes a difference. Discoveries from one examination by Pollner demonstrated that that one motivation behind why strict individuals are more joyful that non-strict individuals is on the grounds that their faith in God gives them a feeling of vicarious authority over outside conditions. Thus, individuals will in general turn out to be more odd when they are put under pressure. This happens is on the grounds that the notion demonstrations like a prop; it gives individuals a feeling of inward consolation when they need power over the outside circumstance.

 

5. b.

What’s the difference among “obsessive pursuit of passion,” “indifferent pursuit of passion” and “dispassionate pursuit of passion” when it comes to how outcomes are judged? In which category do most of us fall? Finally, why is indifferent pursuit of passion not possible? (3 points.)

Obsessive pursuit of passion includes making a decision about results both when they happen. Indifferent pursuit of passion includes not making a decision about results either previously or after they happen. Impartial quest for energy includes having an inclination for specific results over others before they happen, yet not making a decision about them as fortunate or unfortunate after they occur.Most of us fall in the first classification: fanatical quest for enthusiasm. That is, we will in general look for specific results over others since we judge them to be acceptable (or better) and we additionally judge certain results as “great” and different results as “terrible” they occur.Indifferent quest for enthusiasm is preposterous in light of the fact that it’s outlandish not to have pre-event inclination. That is, in any case, and whether we know it or not, we will have inclinations (e.g., for eating food, scratching a tingle, and so forth.)

 

6. a.

In Week 6 of the course, we discussed the many positive consequences of practicing mindfulness. Mention at least three such benefits—one in each of the following three categories: i) physical health, ii) mental health (well-being or happiness), and iii. Success. (3 points)

There are, surely, numerous valuable outcomes from rehearsing care. On the physiological side, they incorporate the following:i. Better heart wellbeing (through fortifying of vagal tone)ii. Lower irritation (prompting lower stress)iii. Relief in the shortening of telomeres (which ensures our DNA strands)iv. Easing back down old enough related cerebrum lossOn the psychological (prosperity/bliss) side, they include:i. Lower stressii. More noteworthy empathy (because of reinforcing of Vagal tone and through actuation of isolated cortex)iii.slowing down of adaptationiv. More prominent interest and intrigue even in consistently (normal) thingsv. More prominent probability of encountering wonder, which increments saw “time wealth,” improving joy levelsFinally, for progress, they include: I. Expanded reaction adaptability, prompting better/more develop decisionsii. More prominent passionate knowledge

 

6. b.

There are many “paradoxes of mindfulness”. Mention one of these paradoxes and briefly explain why it is only an apparent—and not an actual—paradox. (2 points)

Occurring and, simultaneously, appears to include getting all the more personally in contact with what’s going on, ii) that tolerant or grasping a contrary inclination should improve one feel as opposed to more regrettable, lastly, iii) that care would prompt lost suddenness since it improves “reaction adaptability.” All of these are obvious (and not genuine) oddities for the accompanying reasons: First, care includes “removing” from the position of “exposed mindfulness” and not from the position of the “mind.” Second, in spite of the fact that it may create the impression that totally tolerating or grasping a negative inclination may intensify it, it reality it doesn’t on the grounds that once one gets in private touch with one’s sentiments, they lessen to sensations in different pieces of the body. It is the point at which we ruminate about things that they will in general amplify; on the other hand, when one is just watching the negative emotions, they will in general ebb, stream and eventually break down and disappear. .Finally, care doesn’t prompt lost suddenness despite the fact that it builds reaction adaptability since care places us in contact with both what’s happening in our brain and in our bodies. Consequently, it improves both the capacity to settle on develop choices and look after immediacy. What it brings are the propensities down to be indiscreet and over-logical..

 

 

 

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