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The Modern World Part Two : Global History since 1910

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week- 1

Week Eight Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire were the core members of which alliance in early 1914?

1 point

  • Central Powers
  • Tripartite Pact
  • Entente Powers
  • Holy Alliance
  • Axis Powers

2.
Question 2
France, Russia, and Great Britain were the core members of which alliance by late 1914?

1 point

  • Entente Powers
  • Central Powers
  • Axis Powers
  • Tripartite Pact
  • Holy Alliance

3.
Question 3
According to the presentation, while the outbreak of World War I came as a shock to many people at the time, businessmen were not surprised, as analyses of the bond markets prior to the outbreak of war indicate a general trend toward higher interest rates and other hedges against looming instability.

1 point

  • False
  • True

4.
Question 4
According to the presentation, one of the major reasons the outbreak of World War I came as a shock to so many was due to the fact that the relative peace in Europe since 1815 had been profitable, and it seemed increasingly inconceivable that actions would be taken to jeopardize economic growth.

1 point

  • True
  • False

5.
Question 5
According to the presentation, which European power, more than any other, held the strategic initiative to risk general war in 1914?

1 point

  • Great Britain
  • Russia
  • Germany
  • France
  • Austria-Hungary

6.
Question 6
According to the presentation, which of the following was true of the German Kaiser on the eve of World War I?

1 point

  • The Kaiser was a popularly elected leader.
  • The Kaiser was the head of a unitary German government and fully controlled the imperial budget.
  • The Kaiser tended to represent the bellicose public against the nobility, which preferred continued peace.
  • The Kaiser was a figurehead for the real chief executive, the popularly elected Chancellor Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg.
  • The Kaiser represented a class of aristocrats, many of them landed nobles, who were increasingly at odds with the prevailing politics of the empire.

7.
Question 7
In December 1912, Germany secretly affirmed war plans that called for a decisive invasion of which country in the event of general war breaking out over the Balkans?

1 point

  • Great Britain
  • Russia
  • France
  • Serbia
  • Bulgaria

8.
Question 8
According to the presentation, which of the following best describes Kaiser Wilhelm’s attitude at the end of 1912?

1 point

  • Hopeful that British diplomatic intervention would avert the danger of war in the Balkans
  • Increasingly fatalistic about an impending war with Russia and France
  • Desperate to avoid the outbreak of war in Europe
  • Determined to maintain the current balance of power in Europe
  • Fearful of the increasing power of Austria-Hungary

9.
Question 9
According to the passage by Helmuth von Moltke: “_____________ will not be vanquished in this war, it is the only nation which can at present take over the leadership of mankind toward higher goals…”

1 point

  • The Slav peoples
  • Britain
  • Germany
  • Russia
  • The Latin peoples

10.
Question 10
In the passage, Helmuth von Moltke criticizes the British as being which of the following?

1 point

  • Spiritual barbarians
  • Past the zenith of their development
  • Backward
  • Materialistic
  • All of the above

11.
Question 11
According to the presentation, the European governments had difficulty mobilizing their populations for war in 1914 because vast portions of the citizenry were ambivalent about going to war over a narrow conflict in the Balkans and saw no higher ideals at issue.

1 point

  • True
  • False

12.
Question 12
The British decided to enter the war on the side of France and Russia after the German invasion of which country?

1 point

  • Belgium
  • France
  • Russia
  • Serbia
  • The Netherlands

13.
Question 13
Near the end of 1914, which of the following countries entered the war on the side of the Entente Powers?

1 point

  • Bulgaria
  • The United States
  • The Ottoman Empire
  • China
  • Japan

14.
Question 14
Near the end of 1914, which of the following countries entered the war on the side of the Central Powers?

1 point

  • Bulgaria
  • China
  • Japan
  • The Ottoman Empire
  • The United States

15.
Question 15
The Serbian government, at least some of which had hoped that the assassination of Franz Ferdinand might spark a conflict that would weaken Austria-Hungary, had succeeded in occupying large swaths of Austro-Hungarian territory by the end of 1915.

1 point

  • False
  • True

16.
Question 16
According to the presentation, American President Woodrow Wilson held which of the following positions in 1916?

1 point

  • He sympathized with the war aims of the Central Powers, but he thought the United States should remain neutral in order to protect trade relations.
  • He was actively looking for ways to expand America’s colonial domains while the European powers were preoccupied with war.
  • He sympathized with the war aims of the Entente Powers, but he thought the United States should remain neutral in order to protect trade relations.
  • He had no sympathy for the war aims of any of the belligerents, and he wanted to keep the United States out of the war while searching for diplomatic means of bringing the war to an end.
  • He desperately wanted the United States to enter the war on the side of the Entente, but he was blocked by public opposition and an isolationist Congress.

17.
Question 17
According to the presentation, what kind of leverage did Woodrow Wilson have over the European powers in 1916? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Wilson’s neutrality was viewed as genuine, and this gave him standing as a potential broker of a settlement.
  • Despite American neutrality, the American military buildup of 1915 made the United States the strongest military in the world. Wilson hoped to leverage this military superiority to get the belligerents to the negotiating table.
  • American sea trade with Germany was substantial, and the threat of halting this trade was a source of considerable leverage.
  • Even though the American army was small, the threat of an American entry into the war was still something the Germans wanted to avoid.
  • American loans to Great Britain were substantial, and the threat of halting these loans was a source of considerable leverage.

18.
Question 18
According the presentation, what is the reason the United States missed its opportunity to launch a peace move in the late summer/early fall of 1916, at a time when Germany and Britain might have been open to such a move?

1 point

  • Wilson waited to make a peace move until after the presidential election of November 1916, at which point it was too late.
  • Wilson was waiting to make a peace move until after the American military buildup was complete, so that he would have greater leverage.
  • German unrestricted U-boat warfare had shifted American public opinion away from peaceful neutrality and in favor of entering the war on the side of the Entente.
  • The United States was preoccupied with dealing with a domestic financial panic.
  • Wilson suffered a debilitating stroke in August 1916 and was not well enough to launch a peace move.

19.
Question 19
Which country’s government collapsed in early 1917 under the strain of the war effort?

1 point

  • Austria-Hungary
  • The Ottoman Empire
  • Great Britain
  • Germany
  • Russia

20.
Question 20
According to the presentation, which of the following contributed to the American decision to enter the war in 1917? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Great Britain threatened to cut off its lucrative sea trade with the United States.
  • German unrestricted submarine warfare threatened American trade and could not be tolerated.
  • Woodrow Wilson believed that the best way to have a hand in shaping the peace and influencing the shape of the postwar world was by bringing the United States into the war.
  • Woodrow Wilson realized that the United States had a better chance at expanding its overseas empire if it became a belligerent in the war.
  • Public outrage developed over the German attempt to convince Mexico to declare war on the United States.

 

 

Week- 2

Week Nine Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
According to the presentation, which of the following were best prepared to facilitate the rise of “total states” during World War I?

1 point

  • National conservatives
  • Liberals
  • National traditionalists
  • Democratic socialists
  • Revolutionary socialists

2.
Question 2
According to the presentation, the entry of the United States into the war in the spring of 1917 effectively made an Allied victory inevitable by early 1918.

1 point

  • False
  • True

3.
Question 3
According to the presentation, German grand strategy was predominantly in the hands of which man in early 1918?

1 point

  • Chancellor Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg
  • Chancellor Georg von Hertling
  • Kaiser Wilhelm II
  • General Erich von Ludendorff
  • General Paul von Hindenburg

4.
Question 4
According to the presentation, which of the following was a factor in the tipping of the balance in favor of the Allied Powers by the summer of 1918? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • By the summer of 1918, American forces had moved into significant combat action in Europe.
  • The Allies made a number of scientific advances, in areas such as poison gas and airpower, that bolstered their war effort and allowed them to begin to overtake the German forces.
  • The Allies were able to leverage considerably more material resources due to their control of the seas and the failure of the German U-boat offensives.
  • Germany undermined its stable tactical position through a series of ruinous offensives in the spring of 1918 that left the German forces spent, both physically and emotionally.
  • Allied political leadership proved to be more resilient and adaptive than that of the Central Powers.

5.
Question 5
Which of the following empires came to an end between 1910 and 1920? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • The British Empire
  • The Qing Empire
  • The French Empire
  • The Ottoman Empire
  • The German Empire

6.
Question 6
In the aftermath of World War I, Woodrow Wilson succeeded in convincing the victorious powers to concentrate on acknowledging the self-determination of nations and building lasting international institutions, instead of on balance of power politics and score settling against the losers.

1 point

  • False
  • True

7.
Question 7
In 1921-22, the signatories to the “Washington system” treaties decided which of the following in regard to China?

1 point

  • Manchuria was made a formal Japanese mandate, while the remainder of China was left under the rule of the Chinese.
  • Central China remained under Chinese rule, but the entire Chinese coastline was carved up between the nine powers.
  • The nine powers agreed to respect the territorial integrity of China, including a Japanese withdrawal from parts of mainland China.
  • All of China was carved up between the nine powers, with France and Great Britain controlling the most resource rich Chinese territory.
  • The Chinese navy was pegged at a ratio of 5:5:3 with those of Great Britain and the United States.

8.
Question 8
Which of the following best describes the situation in the Russian Empire at the start of 1917?

1 point

  • The tsar and nobles were aligned, but an equally strong parliament dominated by democratic socialists served as a check on the power of the ruling elite.
  • The tsar was the figurehead of the country, with the real political power residing in the Russian parliament, which was dominated by democratic socialists.
  • The tsar ruled in conjunction with a relatively strong parliament, which consisted of a coalition of liberals and democratic socialists.
  • The tsar was merely a figurehead, with the real power residing with the landed nobles who comprised the parliament.
  • The tsar and nobles were aligned, while the parliament was so powerless that few outlets for opposition existed short of revolutionary action.

9.
Question 9
According to the presentation, the provisional government implemented in Russia after the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II was dominated by which of the following?

1 point

  • Bolsheviks
  • National conservatives
  • Democratic socialists
  • Liberals
  • Tsarists

10.
Question 10
According to the presentation, one of the major differences between democratic socialists and Bolsheviks in Russia in 1917 was the fact that the democratic socialists wanted to redistribute private property to poor peasants, while the Bolsheviks wanted to abolish private property and put land under centralized state control.

1 point

  • False
  • True

11.
Question 11
According to the presentation, while anti-communist movements developed in the years after World War I, anti-communism would not become a powerful political force for another 30 years, in the aftermath of a second catastrophic war.

1 point

  • False
  • True

12.
Question 12
According to the presentation, fascism is a combination of which of the following ideologies? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • National tradition
  • Liberalism
  • National conservatism
  • Democratic socialism
  • Revolutionary socialism

13.
Question 13
According to the presentation, faith in _____________ suffered a serious blow in the aftermath of World War I. Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Missionary zeal
  • Rationality
  • Progress
  • Nationalism
  • The State

14.
Question 14
According to Benito Mussolini, fascism is which of the following? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Individualistic
  • Action-oriented
  • Totalitarian
  • Reactionary
  • Anti-Liberal

15.
Question 15
According to the presentation, most women’s rights activists in the late 1800s and early 1900s were agitating less about equal political rights for women and more for the overthrow of women’s traditional social roles.

1 point

  • True
  • False

16.
Question 16
According to the presentation, modern feminism, with its emphasis on emancipation and broader social roles for women, had its early roots in which period?

1 point

  • Post-World War II
  • The 1910s and early 1920s
  • The early years of the 20th century
  • The 1930s and 1940s
  • The late 19th century

17.
Question 17
In the presentation, cities such as Shanghai, Tokyo, and Saigon are referred to as “transmission belts.” Which of the following best defines this term, as used in the presentation?

1 point

  • In these cities, Westerners were exposed to Eastern styles, which they then transplanted back home, resulting in new Asian influences in the popular styles of Western cities.
  • These cities were implicated in the transmission of a deadly strain of influenza in 1918 that grew into a worldwide pandemic that killed tens of millions.
  • These cities were hubs for the importation of Western ideas about equal political rights for women, which were then imitated in local laws.
  • These cities were hubs for the importation of Western fashions, conveniences, and cosmetics, with unique fusions of Eastern and Western styles and growing numbers of “modern women.”

18.
Question 18
According to the presentation, the unsatisfactory conclusion of World War I and the unequal terms of the postwar treaty settlements made it inevitable that renewed European war would erupt again within one or two decades.

1 point

  • False
  • True

19.
Question 19
According to the presentation, which of the following was a component of the global financial framework of the 1920s? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • A renewed international commitment to the gold standard.
  • Primary reliance on loans from British firms to rebuild the global financial system.
  • American seizure of German territory and industry as payment on defaulted war reparations.
  • Primary reliance on loans from American firms to rebuild the global financial system.
  • The implementation of a floating exchange rate system as a replacement for the pre-war gold standard.

20.
Question 20
Atatürk, the leader of Turkey in the 1920s and 1930s, is best described by which of the following?

1 point

  • He was devoted to the revival of Ottoman rule in Anatolia.
  • He was a devout Muslim and sought to fashion Turkey into a modern Islamic state.
  • He hoped to model Turkey on the example of the Soviet Union, creating a communist foothold in Southwest Asia.
  • He was aggressively secular and nationalist, attempting to modernize Turkey through a series of Western-style reforms.

 

Week- 3

Week Ten Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
According to the presentation, which country was NOT a participant in the gold standard system in 1929? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • The United States
  • China
  • Great Britain
  • Germany

2.
Question 2
The “hydraulic system” of war debt repayment in the 1920s and 1930s that is referenced in the presentation was based primarily on flows of funds from which of the following?

1 point

  • Private American firms
  • The League of Nations
  • The British government
  • Private British firms
  • The U.S. government

3.
Question 3
According to the presentation, which of the following contributed to the worldwide Great Depression in the 1930s? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • The individual and governmental decisions to liquidate assets and hold onto cash in the face of economic downturn led to further reductions in demand.
  • The stock market crash of 1929 in the United States reduced the amount of private American credit available to European borrowers.
  • Political rivalries kept the European countries from working together to handle the impact of reduced funds from the United States on the financial situation in Europe.
  • Massive printing of paper money in the United States and Europe to combat the growing crisis in early 1930 devalued currencies and led to high interest rates that further reduced demand.
  • The exit of the United States from the gold standard in 1929 destabilized the world economy even further after the stock market crash.

4.
Question 4
According to the presentation, Great Britain and France undertook new imperial initiatives in the early 1930s to gain access to new markets that would shield them against the effects of the developing global economic crisis.

1 point

  • False
  • True

5.
Question 5
In 1931, Japan invaded and took control of which territory?

1 point

  • The Yangtze valley
  • Midway Island
  • Manchuria
  • The Philippine Islands
  • Indonesia

6.
Question 6
According to the presentation, which group dominated Japanese politics by 1933?

1 point

  • Militant national conservatives
  • Liberal internationalists
  • Monarchists
  • Socialists
  • Communists

7.
Question 7
According to the presentation, which of the following was true of the Nazi share of the vote in the November 1932 German federal election compared with the Nazi share in the July 1932 federal election?

1 point

  • The Nazi share of the vote increased dramatically in November 1932, forcing the Republic to give them the right to govern.
  • The Nazi share decreased slightly in the November 1932 election, but despite this the Nazis were given the opportunity to govern.
  • The Nazi share increased slightly in the November 1932 election, making it possible for the Nazis to get a chance at governing.
  • The Nazi share of the vote plummeted in November 1932, forcing the Nazis to prepare a forcible seizure of power.
  • The Nazis were not allowed to participate in the German federal elections in 1932 because the Republic had banned the party after its behavior in the 1930 election.

8.
Question 8
According to the presentation, what was the state of global free trade in 1932?

1 point

  • Europe remained committed to free trade, while the United States abandoned free trade to focus on domestic recovery.
  • Great Britain was the only country of the world still committed to free trade principles.
  • Most countries of the world, including Great Britain, had abandoned free trade in the face of the growing economic collapse.
  • Most industrialized countries maintained a commitment to free trade as a way of combating the growing global economic crisis.
  • The United States was the only country of the world still committed to free trade principles, taking over the historic role of Great Britain.

9.
Question 9
According to the presentation, the London Economic Conference of 1933, the last real major attempt at international economic cooperation during the Great Depression, was torpedoed by which country?

1 point

  • Italy
  • Great Britain
  • Japan
  • The United States
  • Germany

10.
Question 10
According to the presentation, between 1919 and 1939, the trend in Central and Eastern Europe was toward what kind of political regime?

1 point

  • Dynastic monarchies
  • Socialist democracies
  • Right-wing dictatorships
  • Liberal democracies
  • Communist dictatorships

11.
Question 11
According to Erich Fromm, many people in the 1930s were trying “to feel security again by the elimination of this burden: ________________.”

1 point

  • the State
  • the self
  • the gold standard
  • religion
  • communism

12.
Question 12
According to the presentation, social democracy is a fusion of which of the following? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Fascism
  • Communism
  • Democratic socialism
  • National conservatism
  • Liberalism

13.
Question 13
According to the presentation, the major prototype of a social democratic approach to national government during the 1930s was which country?

1 point

  • The United States
  • Spain
  • France
  • Japan
  • Germany

14.
Question 14
According the presentation, which two political families were most influential in the 1930s? Choose two.

1 point

  • Fascism
  • National conservatism
  • Liberalism
  • Communism
  • Democratic socialism

15.
Question 15
According to the presentation, by 1937 Joseph Stalin had undertaken which of the following to strengthen the USSR? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • He forced collectivization of Soviet farmers as a means of providing food to the industrializing cities.
  • He entered into a security treaty with France and Great Britain, as a hedge against the growing power of Nazi Germany.
  • He began systematic internal purges of Soviet officials to consolidate his power and prepare for future external wars.
  • He reached out to build an alliance with Nazi Germany.
  • He entered into a war with Japan for control of Manchuria.

16.
Question 16
According to the presentation, which of the following best describes Adolf Hitler’s thinking in 1937?

1 point

  • Hitler was hoping to build a network of alliances that would ensure German security without territorial conflict or war.
  • Hitler was primarily focused on planning for an inevitable reckoning with the “decadent, materialist” Americans.
  • Hitler was preparing for a long-planned invasion of the Soviet Union in early 1938.
  • Hitler was focused on ensuring unity and adequate living space for the “Germanic peoples,” and he believed that imperial expansion to the west was the primary way to achieve this.
  • Hitler was focused on ensuring unity and adequate living space for the “Germanic peoples,” and he believed that imperial expansion to the east was the primary way to achieve this.

17.
Question 17
Which of the following was part of the Munich Agreement of September 1938? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Germany was allowed to annex Poland.
  • Germany was allowed to annex Belgium.
  • Germany promised not to invade the remainder of Czechoslovakia outside of the Sudetenland.
  • Germany was allowed to annex the entirety of Czechoslovakia.
  • Germany was allowed to annex the Sudetenland portion of Czechoslovakia.

18.
Question 18
Which of the following best describes the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of 1939?

1 point

  • It was the agreement by which Nazi Germany annexed the remainder of Czechoslovakia.
  • It was an agreement between the Soviet Union, France, and Great Britain pledging to protect the territorial integrity of Poland.
  • It was a non-aggression pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, which included a provision for the division of Poland between the Nazis and Soviets.
  • It was a non-aggression pact between Poland and Nazi Germany.
  • It was the treaty that allowed Germany to annex Poland.

19.
Question 19
According to the presentation, Great Britain and France declared war on Nazi Germany September 1939 over which issue?

1 point

  • The territorial integrity of Belgium
  • The territorial integrity of Poland
  • The territorial integrity of Czechoslovakia
  • The Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact
  • The remilitarization of the Rhineland

20.
Question 20
According to the presentation, by the end of the summer of 1940, the democracies had lost the ability to take the strategic initiative while the dictatorships seemed to be on the verge of carving up the world.

1 point

  • True
  • False

 

 

Week- 4

Week Eleven Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
According to the presentation, during what period did the regional wars in Europe and Asia coalesce into a truly global war?

1 point

  • 1941-1942
  • 1937-1938
  • 1940-1941
  • 1939-1940
  • 1938-1939

2.
Question 2
According to the presentation, which of the following was true of Hitler’s thinking by the end of 1940? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • By late 1940, Hitler had decided to shift his focus to planning an invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941.
  • After being defeated in the Battle of Britain, Hitler realized that Great Britain was being propped up by American military aid. He then shifted his primary focus to making plans for war with the United States in early 1941, before the Americans had a chance to fully mobilize.
  • After being defeated in the Battle of Britain, Hitler largely abandoned his plans to invade Great Britain across the English Channel.
  • After wearing down the British defenses during the Battle of Britain, Hitler shifted his primary focus to Operation Sea Lion, the planned invasion of Great Britain across the English Channel in early 1941.
  • After being defeated in the Battle of Britain, Hitler reached out to Stalin in the hopes of forming a stronger military alliance to defeat the British and carve up all of Europe between them.

3.
Question 3
According to the presentation, which of the following was true about the United States in 1940-1941? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • By late 1940, American public opinion was overwhelmingly in favor of American entry into the war on the side of the Allies, but Congress was overwhelmingly isolationist and refused to vote a declaration of war.
  • Franklin Roosevelt won election to an unprecedented third term in 1940 mainly on the strength of his promise to bring the United States fully into the war on the Allied side.
  • Because of the Roosevelt administration’s strict interpretation of the Neutrality Acts, virtually no American military aid could be provided to any of the belligerents in 1940-1941.
  • In secret war planning in 1940-1941, the U.S. military planners decided on a Japan First strategy should the United States be drawn into war.
  • None of the above

4.
Question 4
According to the presentation, which of the following was a consequence of Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941 by Germany and its allies? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • The invasion diverted German resources, manpower, and focus away from the Western Front, allowing the exiled French government to launch a bold, but eventually failed, campaign to retake France from the Nazis.
  • The invasion diverted German resources, manpower, and focus away from the Western Front, thus effectively removing the threat of a German invasion of Great Britain.
  • The two most powerful countries in the world did not leverage their combined resources to a common cause of securing control of Europe and other regions.
  • In response to the German-led invasion, the United States began taking more aggressive steps against Japanese expansion in order to deter Japan from attacking the Soviet Union.
  • The seeming likelihood of a German victory emboldened the Japanese to take more aggressive steps in Asia and the Pacific.

5.
Question 5
According to the presentation, why were the United States and Japan unable to come to a “modus vivendi” in 1941? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • The United States would not assent to continued Japanese expansion in China.
  • The Japanese felt the need, especially in light of American sanctions, for imperial expansion in resource-rich countries of Southeast Asia.
  • The Japanese invasion of the Soviet Union in early 1941 threatened the Allied war effort, in which the United States had a major stake.
  • The Japanese were optimistic about prospects of a German victory against the Soviet Union.
  • Germany promised Japan backing in a war with the United States, thus strengthening the Japanese position and resolve.

6.
Question 6
According to the presentation, why was the United States not forced into a Japan First strategy after the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Despite the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and later on Midway, Hawaii remained under American control along with the strategic oil reserves and other support facilities there, allowing the United States to maintain adequate combat operations in the western Pacific.
  • Soon after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Soviet troops launched an assault on Manchuria, thus freeing the Americans forces to focus on the European theater.
  • Germany, honoring its promise to Japan, declared war on the United States shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, thus giving the United States cause to implement its Germany First war plans even though it had been attacked by Japan.
  • Chinese forces won victories against the Japanese in early 1942, allowing the United States to focus on Europe.
  • In the spring of 1942, Germany prepared to invade Great Britain, which compelled the United States to enter the war against Germany.

7.
Question 7
According to the presentation, which of the following was the MOST important strategic objective for the Japanese in the spring/summer of 1942, after going to war against the United States?

1 point

  • The Japanese most needed to knock the British out of India so that they could gain access to the wealth of Indian raw materials for their war effort.
  • The Japanese most needed to aid the Germans against the Soviet Union by launching an invasion of the USSR from Manchuria, thus forcing the Soviets to fight a two-front war.
  • The Japanese most needed to invade and occupy Australia in order to neutralize any threat of a British/Australian counterattack from there.
  • The Japanese most needed to invade and occupy Hawaii, to deprive the United States of its most critical forward base and force the Americans to conduct a war across the Pacific from California.
  • The Japanese most needed to conquer all of China in order to consolidate their gains there.

8.
Question 8
According to the presentation, why was the Battle of Midway in June 1942 so important?

1 point

  • The decisive Japanese victory threatened Hawaii and forced the Americans to shift to a Japan First strategy for conducting the war.
  • After the American victory at Midway, the demoralized Japanese were forced to abandon most of their newly occupied territory in Southeast Asia and withdrew to a defense of the home islands of Japan.
  • The inconclusive result of the Battle of Midway led the Soviet Union to launch an attack on Manchuria in order to divert Japanese resources and allow the Americans to continue with a Germany First strategy.
  • The decisive American victory allowed the United States to continue with a Germany First strategy for conducting the war.

9.
Question 9
According to the presentation, while the continental United States remained effectively untouched by fighting during World War II, the particular problem faced by the Americans was how to supply and man the numerous fronts on which they were fighting, in both the Pacific and Atlantic, while still maintaining a domestic workforce capable of producing armaments for the war effort along with foodstuffs and other consumer goods for both domestic and Allied populations.

1 point

  • False
  • True

10.
Question 10
According to the presentation, which of the following was a gamble made by the United States in its strategy to balance its commitments during World War II?

1 point

  • The Americans gambled on a Germany First strategy in prosecuting the war.
  • The Americans gambled that a relatively small army would be adequate.
  • The Americans gambled on airpower as a means of prosecuting and winning the war.
  • The Americans gambled that they could successfully build an atomic bomb.
  • All of the above

11.
Question 11
Which of the following best depicts what happened to Germany after the defeat of the Nazis in 1945?

1 point

  • Similar to World War I, Germany was allowed to stay intact, but with major industrial and military areas placed under Allied occupation indefinitely.
  • The whole of Germany was occupied by the Soviet Union as retribution for the catastrophic Soviet losses during the battles on the Eastern Front.
  • The whole of Germany was occupied by the British, French, and Americans in order to keep the industrial capacity of Germany from falling into the hands of the USSR, which the Western allies had begun to distrust by 1945.
  • Germany was partitioned among the Allied Powers for military occupation, with the USSR occupying large territories in eastern Germany and the British, French, and Americans occupying large territories in western Germany. Berlin, the capital of Germany, was partitioned along similar lines.
  • Germany was placed under the administrative authority of the new United Nations.

12.
Question 12
According to the presentation, immediately after the end of World War II in 1945, leaders in both the United States and Soviet Union were eager to dispense with the wartime alliance as it was becoming increasingly clear that these two countries had far too many differences to work together.

1 point

  • True
  • False

13.
Question 13
According to the presentation, which of the following was among Stalin’s priority strategies for securing the USSR in the aftermath of World War II? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Disabling Germany and Japan
  • International cooperation through new institutions
  • Preventing a renewed Great Depression
  • Territorial expansion
  • Maintaining the wartime alliance

14.
Question 14
According to the presentation, what were the two dominant political families of the postwar world? Choose two.

1 point

  • Liberalism
  • Fascism
  • Communism
  • Social democracy
  • Democratic socialism

15.
Question 15
According to the presentation, what were the two weakest political families in the postwar world? Choose two.

1 point

  • Communism
  • Fascism
  • Liberalism
  • National conservatism
  • Social democracy

16.
Question 16
According to the presentation, countercyclical macroeconomic theory is most associated with which of the following individuals?

1 point

  • Friedrich Hayek
  • Adam Smith
  • Milton Friedman
  • John Maynard Keynes
  • Karl Marx

17.
Question 17
According to the presentation, which of the following was an element of the “Bretton Woods” system of postwar economic organization? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • A return to the traditional gold standard of the 1920s
  • Restrictions on the free movement of money across borders
  • A “gold-dollar” standard in which limited supplies of gold were linked to quantities of U.S. dollars with other exchange rates then based on dollars instead of directly on gold
  • A return to free trade principles and the reduction of trade walls
  • A floating exchange rate system in which currency convertibility was determined by currency markets rather than by fixed ratios

18.
Question 18
According to the presentation, which of the following was true of the Marshall Plan? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • The mechanism of Marshall Plan aid was that European countries put together a list of needed items, which the American government would then buy from American firms and ship to the participating countries.
  • Since the different European nations had different tariff regimes and rivalries between them, it was necessary for the United States to tailor its aid approach to each country individually.
  • The European nations had to manage political rivalries, not just economic ones, in order to reach the level of cooperation demanded by the Marshall Plan.
  • As a condition of Marshall Plan aid, the United States required participating European countries to reduce trade barriers within Europe and develop a more interdependent European market.
  • The mechanism of Marshall Plan aid was cash transfers from the American government directly to the European countries, which could then use the money to buy goods from wherever they wanted.

19.
Question 19
According to the presentation, while there is room for debate about the objective economic impact of Marshall Plan aid on the European recovery after World War II, the psychological boost provided by the Marshall Plan and its positive effect on political and economic confidence was quite significant.

1 point

  • False
  • True

20.
Question 20
According to the presentation, which of the following best describes the role played by the United States during the Chinese Civil War in the late 1940s?

1 point

  • The United States nominally supported the Nationalist government but had major doubts about Chiang Kai-Shek’s government. After a failed attempt to broker a peace between the two sides, the United States chose not to intervene with American troops during the civil war.
  • The United States sent thousands of ground troops to advise the Nationalists, but this only delayed the Communist victory.
  • Agents of the new CIA covertly infiltrated the Chinese Communist forces and attempted to assassinate Mao Zedong and disrupt the Communist momentum, but they were unsuccessful.
  • The United States viewed Chiang Kai-Shek’s Nationalist government as corrupt and ineffectual and instead sent advisors and materials to the Chinese Communist forces, which were mistakenly viewed as reformers rather than revolutionaries.

 

 

 

Week- 5

Week Twelve Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
According to the presentation, which event catalyzed a period of increasing American engagement and centrality in world events in the mid-20th century?

1 point

  • The fall of Nazi Germany in 1945
  • The fall of France to Nazi Germany in 1940
  • The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941
  • The German invasion of Poland in 1939
  • The outbreak of the Korean War in 1950

2.
Question 2
According to the presentation, which of the following was true of the United States after World War II? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • The economy of the South, long considered inferior to that of the North, began to fully integrate into the national economy.
  • It was the world’s leading example of a truly “Liberal” government, as defined in the political families diagram.
  • It was the world’s leading proponent of international cooperation and free trade.
  • It reverted back to its historical economic protectionism after the war.
  • It began to build a “national security” infrastructure centered on the belief that security must involve the whole state, not just the Army and Navy.

3.
Question 3
According to the presentation, which of the following best describes the American worldview in early 1949?

1 point

  • U.S. policymakers envisioned the United States as a hemispheric superpower, dominating the Western Hemisphere but taking little interest in affairs in Europe or Asia.
  • U.S. policymakers envisioned a complex, multipolar world where Western Europe, China, and Japan would play critical roles, in addition to the USSR and USA.
  • U.S. policymakers envisioned the United States as a hyperpower that could exercise military and economic dominance over a world where no nation was its equal.
  • U.S. policymakers envisioned the United States as an inward looking continental power, content to simply focus on the domestic economy and politics.
  • U.S. policymakers were convinced that a bipolar world was on the horizon, where the only two states that would hold any real power were the United States and Soviet Union.

4.
Question 4
According to the presentation, why was the Soviet detonation of an atomic bomb in 1949 a complicating event for American foreign policymakers?

1 point

  • The Americans feared an imminent Soviet nuclear strike in the western United States and were forced to decide whether to launch a preemptive nuclear strike on the USSR in 1949.
  • Soviet nuclear capability meant the United States was no longer be able to defend Western Europe simply with a nuclear threat. Instead, the large Soviet conventional forces stationed in Europe potentially gave the USSR an advantage.
  • The Americans expected the Soviets to use the nuclear stalemate as cover to launch an invasion of Japan, which would force the United States to use nuclear weapons against Soviet targets.
  • After the twin atomic bombs dropped on Japan, the United States had closed down its nuclear program. With the Soviet test, the Americans were forced to restart a nuclear program on the fly.

5.
Question 5
According to Joseph Stalin, which of the following made possible a more active Soviet stance on the unification of Korea by April 1950? Choose all that apply

1 point

  • The Soviet detonation of an atomic bomb in 1949
  • Soviet intelligence detailing the disarray in the South Korean government and the lack of will for war among South Korea’s leadership
  • The victory of the Communists in the Chinese Civil War and the declaration of the PRC in 1949
  • The rise of a communist government in Japan in March 1950
  • Soviet intelligence that the Americans were not inclined to intervene in Korea

6.
Question 6
According to the presentation, why did the United States continue pushing north in September 1950, instead of stopping at the 38th parallel after driving back the North Korean invaders?

1 point

  • American policymakers were hoping to draw Soviet forces into the war, which would give them an excuse to launch preemptive nuclear strikes on targets in the USSR before the Soviet nuclear program was at full strength.
  • Remembering the lessons of World War II, American policymakers believed they had to totally defeat the North Korean aggressor, in much the same way that Hitler’s Germany had been utterly defeated.
  • U.S. policymakers wanted to send a message to China and the USSR that the United States had superior forces and weapons at its disposal and was willing to use them.
  • President Truman, facing Republican criticism that he had “lost China,” was planning to launch an invasion of the Chinese mainland from Korea in an effort to topple the Chinese Communist government.

7.
Question 7
By October 1950, Joseph Stalin believed that, if Chinese war against the United States in Korea led to general war, such a war should be delayed as long as possible in order to give the USSR time to sufficiently recover from World War II and to build its nuclear arsenal.

1 point

  • False
  • True

8.
Question 8
According to the presentation, which of the following were actions taken by the United States after the entrance of China into the Korean War in November 1950? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • The United States agreed to an armistice restoring the division of Korea at the 38th parallel in early January 1951.
  • The United States abandoned its position in Germany, for fear of getting dragged into another Korea-like conflict there.
  • The United States declared war on the People’s Republic of China in early December 1950.
  • The United States initiated a massive mobilization, calling up reserves and ramping up domestic civil defense measures in preparation for a possible World War III.
  • The United States committed itself to a stronger military position in Germany in order to keep a Korea-like episode from happening in Europe.

9.
Question 9
According to the presentation, the outbreak of war in Korea and the Chinese entry into that war, more than the Soviet 1949 atomic test or internal advocacy documents like NSC-68, really convinced the President and the Congress that it was necessary to dramatically increase military spending.

1 point

  • False
  • True

10.
Question 10
According to the presentation: Upon joining the American led anti-communist confederation, countries like Great Britain and France agreed to clear all of their foreign policy actions with American officials, who exercised formal veto power over decisions that conflicted with the goals of the confederation.

1 point

  • False
  • True

11.
Question 11
According to the presentation, why did Egypt not get occupied during the Suez Crisis of 1956?

1 point

  • The British and French, still exhausted from the experience of World War II, did not have the appetite for occupation.
  • The United States, still hoping to bring Nasser’s Egypt and other new states into its anti-communist confederation, demanded the British, French, and Israelis withdraw from Egypt and used its political and economic leverage to compel such a withdrawal.
  • The Soviet Union, a supporter of Nasser’s Egypt, threatened war over the Suez, and the British, French, and Israelis were forced to back down.
  • The modernization efforts of Egypt’s Gamal Nasser had resulted in a powerful Egyptian military that was able to thwart the British, French, and Israeli invasions.

12.
Question 12
According to the presentation, which of the following is an element of import-substitution industrialization (ISI)? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Low barriers to trade
  • Depressed real value of currency
  • Increased reliance on local industry
  • High amount of trade with foreigners
  • High barriers to trade

13.
Question 13
According to the presentation, which country employed an export-oriented industrialization (EOI) model of modernization in the 1950s and 1960s?

1 point

  • Japan
  • Brazil
  • China
  • Chile
  • All of the above

14.
Question 14
According to the presentation, which country employed an import-substitution industrialization (ISI) model of modernization in the 1950s and 1960s?

1 point

  • Japan
  • Brazil
  • China
  • Chile
  • All of the above

15.
Question 15
According to the presentation, which of the following was a part of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev’s grand design to reinvigorate the USSR in the late 1950s and early 1960s? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Khrushchev sought to increase Soviet nuclear missile power, believing that Soviet power was more and more tied to its nuclear arsenal.
  • Khrushchev sought massive spending increases on conventional forces, believing Soviet prestige was linked to the size of the Red Army.
  • Khrushchev sought spending cuts on conventional forces and wanted to use the savings to invest in domestic Soviet development.
  • Khrushchev pursued even closer ties with Mao’s China, in order to assert a unified communist movement in the Third World.
  • Khrushchev sought a political victory to unite Berlin under communist rule and drive out the Western powers.

16.
Question 16
According to the presentation, Nikita Khrushchev placed intermediate and medium range nuclear missiles in Cuba in order to checkmate the American threat of nuclear war to defend Berlin. By having many more nuclear missiles within easy striking distance of the United States, Khrushchev would then be able to leverage superior Soviet conventional forces in eastern Germany to prevail in Berlin without as credible a threat of American nuclear reprisal.

1 point

  • True
  • False

17.
Question 17
According to the presentation, which of the following best describes the course of action decided upon by John F. Kennedy in response to the Soviet missiles in Cuba in October 1962?

1 point

  • Kennedy decided to simply blockade Cuba and negotiate a peaceful removal of the missiles, without any threat of future military action.
  • Kennedy ordered an invasion of Cuba before the missiles became operational.
  • Kennedy decided to accept the missiles in Cuba and not risk nuclear war.
  • Kennedy ordered a blockade of Cuba and backed this up with an ultimatum that if the missiles were not removed then the United States might invade Cuba.
  • Kennedy ordered airstrikes against the missiles in Cuba.

18.
Question 18
According to the presentation, which of the following was a part of the agreement between the United States and Soviet Union that ended the Cuban Missile Crisis? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • The United States secretly assured the Soviets that American nuclear missiles in Turkey were slated for removal in the near future.
  • The United States agreed to a unified Berlin under Communist control.
  • Khrushchev agreed to remove from Cuba the nuclear missiles that could strike the United States.
  • The United States pledged not to invade Cuba.
  • The Soviets agreed to allow free movement between East and West Berlin.

19.
Question 19
According to the presentation, why was the European Coal and Steel Community such an astonishing development?

1 point

  • It was the first major attempt to create a European-led alternative to the American anti-communist confederation.
  • For the first time, the Soviet Union allowed its satellite republics in Eastern Europe to become part of a Western-led economic cooperative.
  • For the first time, the Soviet Union agreed to become part of a Western-led economic cooperative.
  • After centuries of warfare and national distrust, France and Germany agreed to pool coal and steel resources, commodities at the very core of national military power in this era.

20.
Question 20
According to the presentation, why was the United States unwilling to launch an invasion of North Vietnam during its involvement in the Vietnam War?

1 point

  • The American generals judged that the North Vietnamese defenses, constructed with Chinese and Soviet aid, were too formidable to launch an effective offensive assault.
  • Khrushchev had issued an ultimatum to the Americans that any action against North Vietnam would result in a Soviet action against Berlin.
  • The Soviets had given North Vietnamese leaders atomic weapons, which the North Vietnamese threatened to use if United States forces crossed into North Vietnam.
  • China had amassed thousands of troops in North Vietnam and threatened war if American forces crossed into North Vietnam. Remembering Korea, U.S. policymakers effectively agreed not to counterattack with an invasion of North Vietnam.

 

 

week- 6

Week Thirteen Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
According to the presentation, the “Great Disruption” of 1968 is best explained by which of the following?

1 point

  • Hypothesis #1: China and the rest
  • Hypothesis #2: Living on the quiet volcano
  • Hypothesis #3: Students
  • Hypothesis #4: American turmoil + Vietnam as a catalyst
  • None of the above provides a full explanation of the events of 1968. Some combination of the above, along with perhaps new analysis, is necessary to get a fuller explanation of the “Great Disruption.”

2.
Question 2
According to the presentation, which of the following resulted from the turmoil of 1968 in the United States?

1 point

  • The United States government decided to end its involvement in the Vietnam War in 1968.
  • The United States government sharply reduced spending on programs to alleviate poverty and on government aid to students.
  • President Lyndon Johnson won reelection in 1968 on the strength of his promise to end American involvement in Vietnam by 1969.
  • The fear and unrest of 1968 helped to bring about the election of Richard Nixon, a candidate who promised law and order.

3.
Question 3
According to the presentation, which of the following best defines the “Brezhnev Doctrine”?

1 point

  • The Brezhnev Doctrine called for stronger ties between China and the USSR, as leaders of the worldwide communist revolution.
  • The Brezhnev Doctrine stated that the USSR would not intervene in the internal affairs of Soviet bloc countries.
  • The Brezhnev Doctrine asserted that Soviet bloc countries would not be allowed to leave the Soviet bloc or shift toward political or economic liberalization opposed by the Soviet Union.
  • The Brezhnev Doctrine allowed for political and economic self-determination by the constituent states of the Soviet bloc.

4.
Question 4
According to the presentation, the “opening” between the United States and China in the early 1970s was the result of which of the following?

1 point

  • Richard Nixon persuaded Mao Zedong to establish better diplomatic terms by threatening American reprisal if Mao refused.
  • After years of worsening relations with the USSR, Mao began to view the United States as a less dangerous enemy than the USSR and moved toward better relations with the Americans.
  • The overthrow of Mao Zedong’s leadership in China in 1971 brought a more pragmatic Chinese government to power, which hoped to achieve relaxed tensions with the United States in order to focus on domestic economic growth.
  • After the excesses of the Cultural Revolution, Mao Zedong wanted the help of the United States in establishing a managed capitalist economy in China.

5.
Question 5
According to the presentation, which of the following contributed to the “great inflation” of the 1970s?

1 point

  • Significant governmental spending to combat unemployment and increase social welfare, with the expectation that higher inflation was the necessary companion to lower rates of unemployment
  • Spikes in oil prices that sent consumer prices skyrocketing in oil importing countries
  • The end of the gold-dollar standard of the Bretton Woods system and the development of an unpredictable exchange rate regime
  • Continued high levels of defense spending in places like the United States, while simultaneously attempting to spend more money to alleviate broad social problems
  • All of the above

6.
Question 6
According to the presentation, the high oil prices of the 1970s tended to benefit the USSR. While the United States was mainly an importer of oil and suffered from inflationary shocks, the USSR produced a great deal of oil and was able to use increased oil revenues to subsidize Warsaw Pact countries and import goods for domestic consumption.

1 point

  • False
  • True

7.
Question 7
According to the presentation, U.S. President Jimmy Carter’s foreign policy approach was notable for its unusual emphasis on which of the following?

1 point

  • Economic cooperation between the superpowers
  • Détente
  • Human rights
  • Realpolitik
  • Containment

8.
Question 8
According to the presentation, the late 1970s saw a resurgence in the West of which political family?

1 point

  • Communism
  • Liberalism
  • National conservatism
  • Fascism
  • Democratic socialism

9.
Question 9
According to Milton Friedman, who were the real conservatives in the United States during the 1970s?

1 point

  • New Deal “liberals,” because they were trying to conserve the big-government status quo
  • Republicans, because they were the party of business
  • Republicans, because they were the party of traditional limited government
  • Democrats, because they were the party of segregation

10.
Question 10
According to the presentation, why was the Soviet installation of SS-20 intermediate-range missiles targeting Western Europe problematic for West European leaders in the 1980s? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Widespread debate erupted over the wisdom of allowing an American counter-deployment of new U.S. missiles to Germany and other European states.
  • The Soviet deployment of these missiles weakened the credibility of the European threat of escalation to nuclear warfare if the Soviet Union and its allies launched a conventional war in Europe, since it was argued that the SS-20 missiles would give the USSR a powerful ability to dominate any nuclear war limited to Europe.
  • Part of the settlement of the Cuban Missile Crisis was that the United States promised never again to place long-range nuclear missiles in Western Europe.
  • The security of the United States might become “decoupled” from that of Western Europe, because the Soviet deployment spotlighted the credibility of the American threat that it would, to help defend Europe, escalate to a global nuclear war involving both the Soviet and American homelands.

11.
Question 11
According to the presentation, Chinese leaders finally decided to adopt a Soviet-style approach to economic and political organization after the death of Mao Zedong, as the chosen response to the revolutionary excesses of the Cultural Revolution.

1 point

  • True
  • False

12.
Question 12
According to the presentation, which Asian country had the highest GDP per capita in 1976?

1 point

  • South Korea
  • Taiwan
  • China
  • North Korea
  • Japan

13.
Question 13
According to the presentation, which of the following was a characteristic of the traditional gold exchange standard? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • High capital mobility
  • Low capital mobility
  • Stable exchange rates
  • Unstable exchange rates
  • Monetary independence
  • Monetary interdependence

14.
Question 14
According to the presentation, which of the following was a characteristic of the Bretton Woods economic system? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • High capital mobility
  • Low capital mobility
  • Stable exchange rates
  • Unstable exchange rates
  • Monetary independence
  • Monetary interdependence

15.
Question 15
According to the presentation, which of the following was a characteristic of the “World Money 3.0” system taking shape by the end of the 1970s and early 1980s? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • High capital mobility
  • Low capital mobility
  • Managed exchange rates
  • Unstable exchange rates
  • Monetary independence
  • Monetary interdependence

16.
Question 16
According to the presentation, Soviet per capita GDP growth did which of the following between 1976 and 1986? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Increased relative to South Korea
  • Decreased relative to Japan
  • Decreased relative to Western Europe
  • Decreased relative to the United States
  • Increased relative to Japan

17.
Question 17
“Glasnost” is best defined by which of the following English-language words?

1 point

  • Openness
  • Retrenchment
  • Re-engagement
  • Revolution
  • Restructuring

18.
Question 18
According to the presentation, which of the following best describes the views of Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev during the middle and late 1980s?

1 point

  • Gorbachev sought reduced tensions with the West as a means of focusing on the political and economic openness and restructuring he was hoping to undertake domestically, an agenda that he shared with others in the Soviet government and military.
  • Gorbachev sought a renewed confrontation with the United States as a test of Soviet culture and military strength.
  • Gorbachev sought domestic reform in the Soviet Union, but he was unable to find any allies in the Soviet government or military and was forced by hardliners into a renewed confrontation with the United States.
  • Gorbachev’s stated goal upon taking office was the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the creation of a Russian Federation that would be politically and economically stronger without the burden of the satellite republics.

19.
Question 19
According to the presentation, the Two Plus Four Treaty and use of Article 23 in West Germany’s Basic Law resulted in a merger of East and West Germany and the creation of an entirely new kind of German republic, one with a new constitution, new governing structure, and new currency.

1 point

  • True
  • False

20.
Question 20
According to the presentation, which of these dates does the professor prefer for determining when the Cold War ended?

1 point

  • 1985-86, with the rise to power of Mikhail Gorbachev in the Soviet Union
  • 1988-1989, with the fall of the Berlin Wall and the Soviet refusal to intervene militarily in Poland, Hungary, or Leipzig
  • 1990, with the unification of Germany and the signing of the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE), along with the continued self-determination of nations in Eastern Europe
  • 1991, with the breakup of the Soviet Union

 

 

Week- 7

Week Fourteen Quiz

 

1.
Question 1
According to the professor, the most ambitious arms-control treaty ever negotiated was _______________.

1 point

  • the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE)
  • the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START)
  • the North Atlantic Treaty (NATO)
  • the Belavezha Accords
  • the Intermediate Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) Treaty

2.
Question 2
According to the presentation, the institutions that had been established as part of the anti-communist confederation led by the United States ceased to have any real purpose and simply dissolved after the end of the Cold War and the breakdown of the Soviet Union.

1 point

  • False
  • True

3.
Question 3
According to the presentation, the collapse of the Soviet Union was characterized by which of the following? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Economic upheaval
  • Political upheaval
  • Military intervention by the West
  • Social upheaval
  • Massive bloodshed

4.
Question 4
According to the presentation, the majority of violent conflict since 1990 has been internal conflict, such as civil wars, rather than interstate conflict.

1 point

  • True
  • False

5.
Question 5
According to the presentation, what are the two most influential ideological families in the world today? Choose two.

1 point

  • Liberalism
  • Communism
  • Democratic socialism
  • Social democracy
  • National conservatism

6.
Question 6
According to the presentation, which of these is a political enabler of the developing “great convergence” of the 21st century? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Tightly restricted movement of money
  • The gold-dollar standard
  • Safe seas
  • The spread of democracy to countries like China
  • Disappearance of conflict within nations

7.
Question 7
According to the presentation, the percentage of the global population living in urban areas by 2030 is estimated to be __________.

1 point

  • 50%
  • 60%
  • 70%
  • 80%
  • 90%

8.
Question 8
According to the presentation, over the last 10 years the total GDP growth rates of Sub-Saharan Africa have consistently lagged behind world GDP growth rates.

1 point

  • True
  • False

9.
Question 9
According to the presentation, 19th century Muslim writer Jamal al-Din al-Afghani argued that:

1 point

  • Islam and liberalism were diametrically opposing concepts and could not coexist.
  • Islam and liberalism were compatible with one another.
  • Pakistan should become a global center for leadership of the Islamic world.
  • Islam and imperialism were compatible, if only Muslims would accept tutelage from the West.

10.
Question 10
According to the presentation: In traditional Islam, the “rule of law” is _____________.

1 point

  • Non-existent
  • Based in religious law
  • Based on the caprice of individual rulers
  • Based in the enactments of elected representatives

11.
Question 11
According to the presentation: Starting in the late 1970s, Iran and its developing Islamic revolution challenged which country for a leadership role in the global spread of Islam?

1 point

  • Saudi Arabia
  • Egypt
  • Afghanistan
  • Turkey
  • Pakistan

12.
Question 12
Which country is NOT mentioned in the presentation as a perceived enemy of Islam in the 1980s and 1990s?

1 point

  • Israel
  • India
  • Egypt
  • Great Britain
  • The United States

13.
Question 13
According to the presentation, which of the following was a consequence of the American invasion of Iraq in 2003?

1 point

  • The American toppling of Saddam Hussein’s regime brought peace to the raging civil war in Iraq and allowed previously conflicting groups to come together for the purpose of building a free Iraq.
  • The American toppling of Saddam Hussein’s regime created the conditions for a revolutionary Islamic dictatorship to rise up and take its place.
  • The American toppling of Saddam Hussein’s regime triggered an Iraqi revolution and civil war, as longstanding tribal and religious tensions were unleashed by the removal of the authoritarian government and its replacement with an American military occupation.
  • The American forces interrupted the Islamic revolution that had been raging in Iraq since the mid-1990s.

14.
Question 14
According to the presentation, which of the following is one of the major drawbacks of an economic order prioritizing the free movement of money?

1 point

  • Increased danger of financial volatility
  • Decreased exchange rate stability
  • Increased inflation
  • Decreased foreign investment
  • All of the above

15.
Question 15
According to the presentation, sharply increasing current account imbalances in the 2000s created high demand for dollar assets, such as mortgage instruments, by countries with large dollar surpluses. This huge demand for dollar assets led both to accelerating asset price inflation and to the popularity of new kinds of dollar assets strongly linked to this inflation. Neither of these trends was checked by domestic or international regulatory institutions. When the asset bubbles popped and asset values plummeted, the effects were felt across the global financial system, thrusting the world into the “Great Recession.”

1 point

  • True
  • False

16.
Question 16
According to the presentation, which of the following is a reason that the “Great Recession” has not deepened into another Great Depression? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Unlike in the 1930s, key countries have been more willing and able, politically, to cooperate to combat the current crisis.
  • Thus far, the major countries have prudently maintained balanced budgets throughout the current crisis, providing stability and predictability to the global financial system.
  • Countries like the United States have thus far been willing to nationalize some large debts in order to keep countries holding American assets, like China, from losing vast amounts of money on their weakened investments.
  • Creditor nations, like China, have so far been willing to forgive large debts in order to keep debtor countries from having to nationalize debts and incur the negative effects of budget deficits.
  • Key central banks have taken radical steps to loosen their monetary policies, keeping interest rates low.

17.
Question 17
During World War II, a permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council was set aside for China at the insistence of which country?

1 point

  • The Soviet Union
  • The United States
  • Great Britain
  • France
  • Japan

18.
Question 18
Which of the following is identified in the presentation as characteristic of “modern” thinking? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • “Creative destruction”
  • Emphasis on “equality” and “liberty”
  • Emphasis on military force
  • Ideological homogeneity
  • Mastery of nature

19.
Question 19
According to the presentation, which of the following is a similarity between the present day and the period of “great acceleration” in the late 19th and early 20th centuries? Choose all that apply.

1 point

  • Relatively stable demographic landscape
  • Centrist dominated political landscape
  • Major emphasis on “rights”
  • Restricted flow of money across borders
  • Transformation of education

20.
Question 20
According to the presentation, what is the foremost transitional region in the world today?

1 point

  • Europe
  • South America
  • North America
  • Asia
  • Africa

 

 

 

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This is JAMD Bokhtier's website.He is a passionate Marketer who dreams,talks,learns and teaches all about Marketing,the owner & the founder of "Life Style Consultant", a specialist in "Digital Marketing" and a Sophophilic.

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